Hello,

my name is David Ovenden and I am a freelance professional photographer providing a wide range of photographic services to individuals and businesses. I specialise in portraits (for social media, family and business), theatre, fashion and commercial photography but I can help you with all your photographic requirements. I offer studio or location shoots, and with my portable studio I can create studio quality shots in your own home, office or at your function. I can cover all areas of London and the South East, or further afield on request.

Recent Work

London Road

This award-winning musical, about an Ipswich community healing itself after the murder of five prostitutes, reveals the real-life story of the residents of London Road, the street where serial Killer Steve Wright lived, as they struggle to make sense of the murders and re-build their lives. Discover their stories

Babes in Arms

The 1937 version of Rodgers & Hart’s BABES IN ARMS is the quintessential ‘Hey, kids, let’s put on a show’ musical, boasting one of the greatest scores ever written.
A group of teenagers are left without adult supervision when their folks hit the vaudeville summer circuit, and the local sheriff is determined to send the loafers to a work farm. But the determined kids talk the sheriff into a two week reprieve, just enough time to produce their own show and prove their mettle. The son of a wealthy Southerner agrees to bankroll the production but only on the condition that the two black kids not appear in the show. The other kids are outraged, but of course the show must go on and does, in a succession of comeuppance, reconciliation and romance. The old-fashioned virtues of a 30’s musical comedy are peppered with socio-political issues which have remained resonant for more than seven decades.
The dazzling score by Rodgers & Hart features many of their most popular songs including My Funny Valentine, The Lady is a Tramp, Where or When and Johnny One Note.

London Road – Headshots

The brief was to take pictures of the cast in character for a new production of London Road to be used in the programme and publicity. The images were to be gritty and ‘warts and all’ to suit the subject matter of the show (the murder of prostitutes in London Road, Ipswich and the reaction of the local people to this).

SSSSPOTY 2016

The Guildford School of Acting’s final-year student Courtney Bowman claimed the £1,000 first prize in The Stephen Sondheim Society Student Performer of the Year competition, held at the Novello Theatre on Sunday 15th May. Courtney’s Sondheim song of choice was “Me and My Town”, reprising her role of corrupt Mayoress Cora Hoover from GSA’s production of Anyone Can Whistle in June 2015.

Runner-up was Eleanor Jackson, a final-year student at the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School, who sang “Sunday in the Park with George” from Sunday in the Park with George and claimed a £500 cheque.

In the Stiles + Drewe Prize – divided into two parts this year – the £1,000 Best New Song award went to Tim Connor’s “Back to School”, and winner of the much-coveted MTI Mentorship award was composer/lyricist Darren Clark and book writer Rhys Jennings for Wicker Husband. Student Ashley Reyes, who sang Tim’s winning song, also received a £100 bonus prize.

Phoenix Artists Club

The Stephen Sondheim Society Presents… continues at the Phoenix Artist Club in London’s West End with three new guests, and Aaron Clingham on the piano. Returning as host is Tim McArthur, who wowed the audience last month with his carefully programmed cabaret and his powerful singing. The Stephen Sondheim Society Presents… is a monthly cabaret slot at the Phoenix Artist Club, situated beneath the Phoenix Theatre in the heart of London’s Theatreland. The cabarets are designed to showcase emerging and established talent in London and beyond, and to celebrate the work of Stephen Sondheim. In addition, we’re also looking to support new musical-theatre writing. The cabarets are also designed to reward finalists from The Stephen Sondheim Society Student Performer of the Year competition.

Out of this World

The consistently reliable Rose and Crown in Walthamstow works its magic again, turning its attention to a little-known Cole Porter show and covering it with almost enough glitter and glitz to hide the cracks in the book.

Out of this World opened on Broadway in 1950 and was one of Porter’s last shows written for the stage. The source material – the Greek myth of Amphitryon as dramatised by Plautus – was given a modern-day reinterpretation by Dwight Taylor and Reginald Lawrence. Porter provided the music and lyrics, and while the songs were much enjoyed at the time (although none becoming a hit) it was the book – seen as too vulgar and rambling – that brought the show to an early close after just 157 performances.

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Previous work

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